How to Multiply Your Twitter Followers in Less Than 10 Minutes

Having a lot of Twitter followers is important if you have a business or brand to promote. Plenty of followers will give you online credibility and people will not hesitate to purchase your product and use your service. However, even gaining one follower is not easy, let alone thousands. There are million accounts on Twitter, each and every one of them is trying to put their name on the map. The competition is fierce there so you need to do something clever to make other Twitter users take interest in you and click the follow button to your account. Turns out it is very simple and if you do it right, you can do it in a very short amount of time. Here are some tips to help you easily gain new followers.

Use Reliable Twitter Tool

The easiest thing to gain follower is of course to buy it. However, using Twitter tool like Tweepi is actually more effective to gain a lot of followers in short amount of time. The best thing about using Twitter tool is you will get real followers, someone you can actually converse with. Using Twitter tool to gain followers means you can find new people to follow as well. You can choose which account you want to follow so your following list will be relevant with your interest.

Post Great Content

Gaining followers is actually the easiest part in using Twitter. The hardest part is to make sure you are not losing them. People in Twitter will only follow interesting accounts. So, if they find that your account is actually boring, they will absolutely leave. To make sure you don’t lose your hard-earned followers, you must post great content in every tweet you make. Post informative and interesting things that are easy to be understood. Don’t forget to use hashtags so people can find you easily.

Engage in Fun and Important Conversation

Last but not least, Twitter is a social media so you need to socialize. Another great way to keep your follower is by interacting with them. It is a great way to gain new friends as well as new customers. When you are promoting your business on Twitter, people will be more interested with you if you reply fast and provide great response. Don’t forget to join the recent trending topics because there is where all the folks gather. If you back your conversation with great and informative content, more people will retweet and you definitely will gain new followers.

Down Payments On Business Loans And Where You Can Get Yours

All small business lenders – banks, private lenders, alternative financing companies, SBA, etc. – have one major thing in common. They require some form of down payment.

Let’s say that you are requesting an unsecured business loan from your bank. And, you are asking for $80,000 that you want to use to purchase some inventory and supplies as well as to bolster your marketing efforts.

And, your bank approves that request. However, they only approve 80% of your requested amount or $64,000. What?

Or, your business is in need of a new routing machine to handle your ever increasing customer load. The equipment costs $50,000. Your lender approves your request but will only fund $40,000 or 80% of what you need. Huh?

Or, your business has $100,000 in outstanding invoices just waiting to get paid by your customers. Yet, you have new orders coming in everyday that you just do not have the cash on hand to start or complete. Therefore, you approach an asset based lender or accounts receivable factor and ask for an advance on those invoices that will pay within the next 30 days. However, the lender will only fund 80% or $80,000 against those invoices – even though they take control of 100% of their face amount. Really?

Down Payments

Why do lenders require down payments? It all started with banks centuries ago. They determined, through trial and error – mostly error – that if a borrower were to put at least 20% down – have 20% of their own money attached to the loan – then they are 80% less likely to just walk away from that loan should the going get tough.

Thus, they determined that 20% in a down payment was both enough to better ensure that their borrowers will repay those loans – the one thing they want the most – and that 20% was enough of an amount (high and low) that only serious borrowers would and could be able to raise that amount.

In fact, when the government got involved in the banking and lending industries, this down payment figure of 20% was one of the first things that they agreed on as a standard practice and now hold these lenders to that standard.

Bottom line is that having a down payment in nearly all lending – mortgage loans as well as business loans – is now the standard and is already calculated in their underwriting process. Thus, you request a business loan for $100,000 – the lender already marks it down by 20%.

Now, leave it to the SBA to throw a wrench into this discussion. The SBA has a business loan program – their 504 loan program – which helps local small businesses finance commercial real estate or business equipment in their local areas. These loans are secured – 100% – by the real estate or equipment. Thus, with this specific loan program – this secured loan program – the SBA lowered its down payment requirement to 10%. Still a down payment but less of a burden on the borrower.

Types Of Down Payments

Now, there are essentially two forms of legitimate down payments.

1) Simply cover the 20% with your own cash. You need $80,000 for your equipment purchase, the bank will provide 80% or $64,000 and you cover the other $16,000 out of your own pocket.

2) You have built in equity in the item being bought with the loan. Here, you are buying a commercial property to expand your small business (and quit paying outrageous rents). The purchase price is $250,000. Yet, that price is only 80% of its market value – the market value is $312,500. Thus, the difference between the purchase price and the true value of the property is the 20% – 20% equity in the property.

Where To Get That Down Payment

There are several ways that you – the business borrower – can get that required down payment as most small business owners either do not have that kind of cash on hand to cover the 20% or just do not know where to obtain it.

Don’t Pay It:

1) Negotiate with the lender. While this does not provide you the equity to put down – it can alleviate that requirement all together. If your business is strong enough and the lender really wants to work with you – then negotiate that requirement away – and get that lender to cover 100% of your needs.

2) Negotiate with the seller. If you are buying a physical asset like equipment or commercial real estate then negotiate the price to 80% of the asset’s value. Kind of hard to do these days with property values being as low as they are and that most equipment vendors do not have control over their prices – but, if the person wants to sell as bad as you want to buy – then they will find a way to work with you – they always do. MSRP prices are more wish lists then actual prices.

Find The Money:

3) Personal loan. Do you have equity in your home or other personal assets? Can you get a personal loan based on the personal income you do have? Can you tap some other source of personal income or equity – that 1) does not relate to your business and 2) does not put an additional burden on your company?

Most lenders will find out about all of your business debt and most of your personal debt during their approval process. Know that with the business debt, they will include that in their underwriting process when approving your business loan request. And, if they find out that you took another business loan to cover your down payment – they tend to frown on that. But, if they find out that you have a personal loan – even if they know that you did that to cover your down payment – it is still a personal loan and something that ties you personally to that new loan request – means you might get away with it.

Or, try to get a personal loan from a friend or family member. This way, it is not reported anywhere and very hard for the new lender to find out about it. This could be a loan or even an equity injection for stock or ownership in the company. Either way, it should not directly affect your new loan request.

The idea here is simple. Let’s say that you need a business loan for $100,000. You request that amount at 8% for three years. This would set your monthly payment at $3,134. But, if the lender will only approve and fund 80% or $80,000 – then your required payment would drop to $2,507 – leaving the difference of $627 to cover that personal loan you need for the down payment ($627 is more then enough to cover the $20,000 personal down payment loan for the same term at the same rate).

4) Sell off unneeded or unused assets – personal or business. This way you get needed money from assets that you don’t need or want and you don’t have to pay that money back – it is free and clear for you to use. Thus, while you are only getting 80% of your requested loan amount – you only have to pay for that 80%. And, the $627 difference – outlined above – is money that you now don’t have to pay to any lender – it is added money in your pocket or for your business.

5) Lastly, use your business. Let’s say that your business needs a $100,000 to expand. Now, it could get a loan now or it could save up its own money – its own profits – for the next 3 years (your business has to be generating some form of profits for you to be able to afford the loan payments in the first place – thus, it can just save that money itself).

But, not wanting to or not seeing it as a viable option to wait 3 years – your business can just save that money (profits) for that down payment only – save for 7 months or so to get that needed 20% – then request the loan. This would have the same benefits of selling off assets for that needed cash without losing the use of those assets. The only requirement here or burden on the business is time – the 7 months.

3 Reason You Should Use A Credit Union For Your Business Loan Needs

Most of the time, when business owners (new entrepreneurs or experienced proprietors) think about financing their businesses, they think about their local banks – which they should. After all, they drive by these organizations everyday and might even have an account or two with them.

But, there are times when these banks might not be the best options for landing a needed business loan – either because the bank does not offer the loan product your company needs or because (like most of us these days) you just do not qualify under their heighten standards.

However, that does not mean that you still cannot get the financing your business wants – from start up funding to growing an established business – from a local financial institution other than your bank.

Did you know that some local credit unions also offer business loans? And, do you know that if they don’t, they do offer other financing products that you can use to start or grow your business?

Credit Unions For Business Financing

If you can get a loan from your bank – great. You should start there. But, if you can’t, simply drive right over to your local credit union and see what loan programs they offer.

Not only do you stand a good chance of getting the capital you need but you might be able to do it cheaper and with a lot less hassle.

Let me explain: First let’s call these CU for simplicity.

CUs, when it comes to business financing, offer the following benefits:

1) Business Loans – Some CUs do provide true business loans – the same products that your local bank offers. And, there are more of them doing this then you think.

Further, in many cases, if the CU does make business loans they usually don’t have such high credit standards that other lenders do. CUs tend to focus more on how your business and their loan impact the community at large – not just their bottom line. Most CUs have lower credit score requirements, better debt ratio limits, lower overall collateral value levels and usually spend less effort on scrutinizing income and tax return information. Simply put, their business loans (the same products that banks and other business lenders offer) are easier to qualify for.

According to State Employees’ CU in Raleigh, NC, when talking about how they underwrite their loan products:

Our focus is not on profits, but on fair, quality service.

So, not only are there underwriting criteria easier to pass, but since they make their loan decisions locally, they tend to take more of your story into account – which only benefits you and your ability to get approved.

2) Personal Loans – while banks also offer personal loans, again, CUs have easier approval standards. And, they are more flexible in the products they offer – making their loans fit you and not the other way around.

Now, you might think that you don’t want a personal loan for your business. But, I am here to tell you that all loans, business, personal or otherwise, from banks, CU, or private lenders, are in fact all personal loans.

Here’s why. You apply for a business loan – the type of lender does not matter – and you jump through all the hoops required to qualify. They look at your revenue or income, they look at your current debt, they look at and valuate your collateral and in the end, they approve your request.

They tell you what your monthly payment will be, they tell you how they are going to attach a claim to your assets and then – here is the kicker – they make you sign a personal guarantee – even on a business loan.

And, it is this personal guarantee that washes away all that other stuff about business credit facilities. Because, if you or your business do not pay as agreed, that personal guarantee allows that lender – bank, CU, private lender – to come after your personal income and assets to make that loan whole – which is the very definition of a personal loan. The one single item that you are looking to avoid by getting a business loan – avoiding personal risk – is also the one single item you cannot avoid, no matter what type of loan you are requesting.

However, there is nothing that states that you cannot use the proceeds from a personal loan in or for your business.

Bottom line here for you is this: If you can’t get a business loan, look to the personal or consumer products CUs offers. Money is just money after all and CUs make getting your hands on that needed money (personal or business) easier.

3) Cheaper All The Way Around – As CUs are non-profit, they have lower application, origination and processing fees on their loan products. They have lower annual fees if any (say on lines of credit). And, they usually charge lower interest rates.

All items that do nothing but benefit you and your business. Why over pay when you don’t have too?

From MyCreditUnion.gov credit unions offer:

Fees and loan rates at credit unions are generally lower, while interest rates returned (dividends paid on deposits) are generally higher, than banks and other for-profit institutions. Credit unions are democratically operated by members, allowing account holders an equal say in how the credit union is operated, regardless of how much they have invested in the credit union.

Conclusion

As I have hoped to point out here, if you already have a relationship with a local bank, then by all means approach that bank for your business loan needs. But, if you don’t or if they turn you down, there is no reason that you cannot just drive right over to one of your local credit unions and see if they will say yes to your same request.

Credit unions offer a lot of benefits when it comes to business financing, namely being easier to qualify for. So, in the end, does it really matter where or what form your business loan come in? Money is just money after all.

SBA Small Business Loans – A Huge Benefit to Start-Up Businesses

Setting up a new business is never easy. There are innumerable details that need to be taken care of. Start-up businesses are mainly dependent on loans for almost all their business requirements. It is therefore extremely important to find an appropriate and reliable lending source to cater to their financial needs. However, since most conventional lenders and banks are not keen on providing loans to new business owners due to various security reasons, opting for SBA small business loans can be an excellent idea.

Small businesses can contribute immensely in developing and enhancing the nation’s economy. The Small Business Administration (SBA), which is a United States government agency that provides loans to small businesses with the aim of improving the country’s financial condition. These loans are meant to support the establishment of small businesses by providing through adequate financial assistance. These loans cannot be obtained directly from SBA, but through a number of their lending partners working in accordance with the SBA rules and regulations.

The SBA offers a wide variety of loans that demand different qualifications of the borrowers. The various financial programs offered by SBA such as surety bonds, debt financing and equity financing are designed to cater to the different financial requirements of borrowers. In order to avail a loan from them, it is extremely important to understand how the SBA works. Let us discuss some basic rules and regulations of the SBA:

The SBA loans are provided to business owners at a lower interest rate than banks and other conventional lending sources owing to the fact that start-up business owners do not have adequate capital to opt for loans with high interest rates.

SBA does not provide loans to small business owners directly. Instead, they merely set certain rules and regulations that are strictly followed by their partners, including private-sector lenders, micro-lending institutions and community development organizations, who are authorized by the SBA to provide loans to start-up businesses.

The loans are provided to the business owners under an SBA guarantee to ensure that the loan is repaid on time to the lending partners. Business owners cannot avail SBA small business loans in case they have the eligibility to obtain loans from other lending sources on affordable and reasonable terms.

You can obtain SBA loans fast and without any kind of hassles. They can be acquired on an immediate basis as soon as they are applied for. This can be immensely beneficial for start-up businesses that need financial assistance for all their business needs. Delay in acquiring loans can create problems for them in setting up the business.

One of the most beneficial aspects of SBA loans is that they can be availed even if you have a poor credit record including bankruptcy, insolvency, IVA etc. It can be an excellent way to improve your credit records.

SBA offers various kinds of loans, including 504 for purchasing real estate and equipment, 7 (a) for common small business loans, disaster loans and microloans. Not all banks issuing SBA loans offer the same loan programs. Moreover, in accordance with individual bank policies, the loan requirements for a particular program can differ from bank to bank.

The SBA rules and regulations for small business loans are designed to help start-up business owners and can be extremely beneficial for them.

Business Loans – Information for Business Owners

A business loan provides financial aid to business of all sizes (i.e. small businesses, medium-sized businesses or start-up businesses). It is ideal for business owners who need funding to enhance or expand their business. When you need a loan for your business, you must adopt a strategic approach. Cautious planning is necessary for ensuring success in obtaining business loans.

Business Plan

When you are considering applying for a business loan, it is important for you to take enough time to create a convincing and detailed business plan. Your business plan should include information, which will assist your finance broker as well as the lender/credit provider in providing you with the right type of finance and advice. Here is a list of information you should include in your business plan:

>> Your business structure

>> The purpose and goals of your business

>> Your past and future plans for your business

>> The profit and loss projections and cash flow forecasts of your business

>> Your marketing strategy (i.e. the products or services your business provides)

It is also important to state in your business plan the specific purpose for which you want to use a business loan.

Decisions to Make

Once you have assessed your needs for a business loan, you should investigate which finance products suit your needs for a business loan as each loan has varying features for you to choose. To help with this process, here is a list of things to consider and which you can discuss with your finance broker:

>> The loan amount required

>> The loan term (i.e. the period in which the loan will need to be repaid)

>> Interest rate type and repayments (i.e. fixed or variable)

>> Loan fees, and

>> Loan security (i.e. the type of security offered by you)

Finance Products

There is a variety of business loans available to choose from. Here is a brief summary of common business loan products specifically designed by lenders/credit providers for business owners, which can assist your individual situation as a business owner:

Commercial Bill Facility

A commercial bill (also called a bank bill or bill of exchange) is a flexible credit facility that can give your business a short-term or long-term injection of cash. The finance provided by the commercial bill can help your business in the event that you may need to solve an unexpected or urgent problem, and you do not have the required cash flow. You agree to pay back the face value of the commercial bill plus interest to the lender/credit provider on a specific maturity date.

Overdraft Facility

The purpose of establishing an overdraft facility is to provide working capital for your business in the short-term, before receiving income. An overdraft facility should not be used for capital purchase or long-term financing needs. The overdraft is a normal trading account facility for your business, whereby the lender/credit provider permits you to use or withdraw more than you have in the trading account. But, only up to an agreed amount and any negative balances typically need to be repaid within a month.

Line of Credit

A line of credit (also called an equity loan) can provide access to funds by allowing you to draw an account balance up to an approved limit. The loans are designed as a long-term debt facility and are usually secured by a registered mortgage over a property.

Fully Drawn Advance

This is a term loan with a scheduled principal and interest repayment program. The loan provides access to funds upfront, which can be used for funding long-term investments that will expand the capacity of your business, such as purchasing a new business or even purchasing equipment. Fully drawn advance loans are usually secured by a registered mortgage over a residential or commercial property or a business asset.

Short-Term Loan

A short-term loan can provide short-term funding needs for your business. You can take out a short-term loan if you want to take advantage of a very quick financial opportunity or to help you get out of a financial cash flow crisis. The loan offers a fixed sum advance and requires a periodical interest charge to be paid by you. Short-term loans typically require a security to be provided.

Business Equipment Finance

If you decide to expand your business operations and take benefits of potential tax advantages, you should consider taking out business equipment finance, as the finance arrangement allows you to buy, lease or hire a new vehicle or specialised equipment (e.g. cars, trucks, forklifts, printing, computing, medical and office equipment as well as plant equipment and machinery). Typical finance arrangements to consider for business equipment finance are asset lease, commercial hire purchase, chattel mortgage or equipment rental.

Truly, there are several finance products available in the market to help business owners. When you seek out finance for your business, don’t be in a hurry. Consider all the alternatives in detail and then choose the one that is right for you and your business.

Small Business Loan Update – Stimulus Bill Helps Bailout Businesses If They Cannot Pay Loans

As we continue to sift dutifully through the over 1,000 pages of the stimulus bill (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009), there is one provision that is not getting much attention, but could be very helpful to small businesses. If you are a small business and have received an SBA loan from your local banker, but are having trouble making payments, you can get a “stabilization loan”. That’s right; finally some bailout money goes into the hands of the small business owner, instead of going down the proverbial deep hole of the stock market or large banks. But don’t get too excited. It is limited to very specific instances and is not available for vast majority of business owners.

There are some news articles that boldly claim the SBA will now provide relief if you have an existing business loan and are having trouble making the payments. This is not a true statement and needs to be clarified. As seen in more detail in this article, this is wrong because it applies to troubled loans made in the future, not existing ones.

Here is how it works. Assume you were one of the lucky few that find a bank to make a SBA loan. You proceed on your merry way but run into tough economic times and find it hard to repay. Remember these are not conventional loans but loans from an SBA licensed lender that are guaranteed for default by the U.S. government through the SBA (depending upon the loan, between 50% and 90%). Under the new stimulus bill, the SBA might come to your rescue. You will be able to get a new loan which will pay-off the existing balance on extremely favorable terms, buying more time to revitalize your business and get back in the saddle. Sound too good to be true? Well, you be the judge. Here are some of the features:

1. Does not apply to SBA loans taken out before the stimulus bill. As to non-SBA loans, they can be before or after the bill’s enactment.

2. Does it apply to SBA guaranteed loans or non-SBA conventional loans as well? We don’t know for sure. This statute simply says it applies to a “small business concern that meets the eligibility standards and section 7(a) of the Small Business Act” (Section 506 (c) of the new Act). That contains pages and pages of requirements which could apply to both types of loans. Based on some of the preliminary reports from the SBA, it appears it applies to both SBA and non-SBA loans.

3. These monies are subject to availability in the funding of Congress. Some think the way we are going with our Federal bailout, we are going be out of money before the economy we are trying to save.

4. You don’t get these monies unless you are a viable business. Boy, you can drive a truck through that phrase. Our friends at the SBA will determine if you are “viable” (imagine how inferior you will be when you have to tell your friends your business was determined by the Federal government to be “non-viable” and on life support).

5. You have to be suffering “immediate financial hardship”. So much for holding out making payments because you’d rather use the money for other expansion needs. How many months you have to be delinquent, or how close your foot is to the banana peel of complete business failure, is anyone’s guess.

6. It is not certain, and commentators disagree, as to whether the Federal government through the SBA will make the loan from taxpayers’ dollars or by private SBA licensed banks. In my opinion it is the latter. It carries a 100% SBA guarantee and I would make no sense if the government itself was making the loan.

7. The loan cannot exceed $35,000. Presumably the new loan will be “taking out” or refinancing the entire balance on the old one. So if you had a $100,000 loan that you have been paying on time for several years but now have a balance of $35,000 and are in trouble, boy do we have a program for you. Or you might have a smaller $15,000 loan and after a short time need help. The law does not say you have to wait any particular period of time so I guess you could be in default after the first couple of months.

8. You can use it to make up no more than six months of monthly delinquencies.

9. The loan will be for a maximum term of five years.

10. The borrower will pay absolutely no interest for the duration of the loan. Interest can be charged, but it will be subsidized by the Federal government.

11. Here’s the great part. If you get one of these loans, you don’t have to make any payments for the first year.

12. There are absolutely no upfront fees allowed. Getting such a loan is 100% free (of course you have to pay principal and interest after the one year moratorium).

13. The SBA will decide whether or not collateral is required. In other words, if you have to put liens on your property or residence. My guess is they will lax as to this requirement.

14. You can get these loans until September 30, 2010.

15. Because this is emergency legislation, within 15 days after signing the bill, the SBA has to come up with regulations.

Here is a summary of the actual legislative language if you are having trouble getting to sleep:

SEC. 506. BUSINESS STABILIZATION PROGRAM. (a) IN GENERAL- Subject to the availability of appropriations, the Administrator of the Small Business Administration shall carry out a program to provide loans on a deferred basis to viable (as such term is determined pursuant to regulation by the Administrator of the Small Business Administration) small business concerns that have a qualifying small business loan and are experiencing immediate financial hardship.

(b) ELIGIBLE BORROWER- A small business concern as defined under section 3 of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 632).

(c) QUALIFYING SMALL BUSINESS LOAN- A loan made to a small business concern that meets the eligibility standards in section 7(a) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 636(a)) but shall not include loans guarantees (or loan guarantee commitments made) by the Administrator prior to the date of enactment of this Act.

(d) LOAN SIZE- Loans guaranteed under this section may not exceed $35,000.

(e) PURPOSE- Loans guaranteed under this program shall be used to make periodic payment of principal and interest, either in full or in part, on an existing qualifying small business loan for a period of time not to exceed 6 months.

(f) LOAN TERMS- Loans made under this section shall:

(1) carry a 100 percent guaranty; and

(2) have interest fully subsidized for the period of repayment.

(g) REPAYMENT- Repayment for loans made under this section shall–

(1) be amortized over a period of time not to exceed 5 years; and

(2) not begin until 12 months after the final disbursement of funds is made.

(h) COLLATERAL- The Administrator of the Small Business Administration may accept any available collateral, including subordinated liens, to secure loans made under this section.

(i) FEES- The Administrator of the Small Business Administration is prohibited from charging any processing fees, origination fees, application fees, points, brokerage fees, bonus points, prepayment penalties, and other fees that could be charged to a loan applicant for loans under this section.

(j) SUNSET- The Administrator of the Small Business Administration shall not issue loan guarantees under this section after September 30, 2010.

(k) EMERGENCY RULEMAKING AUTHORITY- The Administrator of the Small Business Administration shall issue regulations under this section within 15 days after the date of enactment of this section. The notice requirements of section 553(b) of title 5, United States Code shall not apply to the promulgation of such regulations.

The real question is whether a private bank will loan under this program. Unfortunately, few will do so because the statute very clearly states that no fees whatsoever can be charged, and how can a bank make any money if they loan under those circumstances. Sure, they might make money in the secondary market, but that is dried up, so they basically are asked to make a loan out of the goodness of their heart. On a other hand, it carries a first ever 100% government guarantee so the bank’s know they will be receiving interest and will have no possibility of losing a single dime. Maybe this will work after all.

But there is something else that would be of interest to a bank. In a way, this is a form of Federal bailout going directly to small community banks. They have on their books loans that are in default and they could easily jump at the chance of being able to bail them out with this program. Especially if they had not been the recipients of the first TARP monies. Contrary to public sentiment, most of them did not receive any money. But again, this might not apply to that community bank. Since they typically package and sell their loans within three to six months, it probably wouldn’t even be in default at that point. It would be in the hands of the secondary market investor.

So is this good or bad for small businesses? Frankly, it’s good to see that some bailout money is working its way toward small businesses, but most of them would rather have a loan in the first place, as opposed help when in default. Unfortunately, this will have a limited application.

Wouldn’t it be better if we simply expanded our small business programs so more businesses could get loans? How about the SBA creating a secondary market for small business loans? I have a novel idea: for the moment forget about defaults, and concentrate on making business loans available to start-ups or existing businesses wanting to expand.

How about having a program that can pay off high interest credit card balances? There is hardly a business out there that has not been financing themselves lately through credit cards, simply because banks are not making loans. It is not unusual for people to have $50,000 plus on their credit cards, just to stay afloat. Talk about saving high interest. You can imagine how much cash flow this would give a small business.

We should applaud Congress for doing their best under short notice to come up with this plan. Sure this is a form of welcome bailout for small businesses, but I believe it misses the mark as to the majority of the 27 million business owners that are simply looking for a loan they can repay, as opposed to a handout.